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Hospitals told to investigate higher weekend death rates (UK)

News Item

posted by Research Admin on 29 November 2011

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International

Patients admitted out of hours to UK hospitals are 10% more likely to die, prompting calls for NHS services to be reconfigured. Concentration of England's specialist NHS services in fewer hospitals is likely to accelerate, following evidence that patients admitted for emergency treatment at the weekend are almost 10% more likely to die than those admitted in the rest of the week.

The country is "still some way from the target" of a safe NHS 24/7, according to Roger Taylor, co-founder of Dr Foster, introducing its 10th annual hospital guide. It reports "worrying" figures on mortality and staffing at some hospitals that suggest nearly one in eight trusts has higher than expected death rates for patients admitted on Saturdays and Sundays. Many hospitals have far fewer senior staff than other staff working on-site at such times, leaving them on call instead.

For emergency admissions only, the death rate nationally rises from 7.4% of patients admitted during the week to 8.1% at weekends.

To read the full article in The Guardian, go to: http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2011/nov/28/hospitals-higher-weekend-death-rates

To read the original press release, go to: http://drfosterintelligence.co.uk/2011/11/28/press-release-new-report-finds-higher-death-rates-at-hospitals-with-fewer-doctors-at-evenings-and-weekends/