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Analysing risk factors for poorer breast cancer outcomes in residents of lower socioeconomic areas of Australia

International Literature

posted by WM Admin on 2014-04-09 12:20:11.245

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Investigates patient, cancer and treatment factors associated with the residence of female breast cancer patients in lower socioeconomic areas of Australia to better understand factors that may contribute to their poorer cancer outcomes. Analysis of data from the Breast Quality Audit database of Breast Surgeons of Australia and New Zealand indicated that patients from lower socioeconomic areas are more likely to live in more remote areas and to be treated at regional than major city centres. Although they appeared equally likely to be referred to surgeons from BreastScreen services as patients from higher socioeconomic areas, they were less likely to be referred as asymptomatic cases from other sources. In general, their cancer and treatment characteristics did not differ from those of women from higher socioeconomic areas, but ovarian ablation therapy was less common for these patients and bilateral synchronous lesions tended to be less frequent than for women from higher socioeconomic areas.

The authors suggest that poorer outcomes in women from lower socioeconomic areas in Australia may have less to do with the characteristics of their breast cancers or treatment modalities and more to do with health system features, such as access to specialist centres. The recommend that health system research should be strengthened in Australia to augment biomedical and clinical research, with a view to best meeting service needs of all sectors of the population.

To read the full abstract and for information on how to access the full text, go to: http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/AH13080.htm or contact your DHB library, or your local or organisational library for assistance.

Roder, D., et al. (2014). Analysing risk factors for poorer breast cancer outcomes in residents of lower socioeconomic areas of Australia. Australian Health Review38(2), 134-141