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Connecting leisure-time physical activity and quality of sleep to nurse health: Data from the e-Cohort Study of Nurses and Midwives

NZ Literature Abstract

posted by WM Admin on 2015-06-26 10:20:39.603

Authors

Tim Henwood
Anthony Tuckett
Nadja E–Bagadi
John L. Oliffe

Year of Publication

2015

Source

Journal of Nursing & Care, 4:254

Publication Type

Journal article (peer reviewed)

Publication Status

Completed

Abstract

The goal of the current article is to report nurse general and workplace health, productivity and wellbeing by comparing those professionals with recommended levels of physical activity and sleep to those with reduced profiles. Data were generated from the 2006-08 delivery of the e-Cohort survey of nurses and midwives in Australia and New Zealand. The primary analysis (n=3967) was based on the physical activity and sleep categories: (LS1) Meeting the recommended guidelines or above for both leisure physical time activity and sleep; (LS2) Meeting the recommended guidelines or above for leisure time activity but not sleep; (LS3) Meeting the recommended guidelines or above for sleep but not leisure time activity; and (LS4) Not meeting the recommended guidelines for both leisure time activity and sleep. LS1 were significantly younger, had a lower body mass index than any other group and were the least likely to report in-work difficulty, emotional barriers to workplace productivity and restriction in basic daily tasks. LS4 were more likely to have osteoarthritis, depression and high blood pressure. The authors conclude that the study findings confirm health benefits from achieving recommended levels of physical activity and sleep and go on to say that workforce administrators should consider this when designing programs to reduce nurse workplace burnout and aid workforce retention.

How to Access

This is an open access article and can be read in free full text at: http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2167-1168.1000254

Projects

Nurses and Midwives e-cohort Study (NMeS)